Where Do YOU Turn For Answers?

There are so many choices to be made each and every day. Sometimes it’s extremely helpful to get a second opinion.

Where do you turn for answers?

I have just launched the opportunity for me to provide answers and choices and options to anyone who has access to e-mail.

I am opening up the possibilities for everyone to be able to look at options AND fit it into whatever they may already have on their plate for the day.

I’m thinking that a few minutes opportunity to check e-mail between meetings, games, kids, breakfast, lunch, or dinner will net some valuable insights.

It’s a place for answers. Answers to questions about life choices, opportunities, work, family, relationships, and whatever else might be creating a spinning in circles or, horrors of horrors,¬† that dreaded hesitation to move forward.

Here is the link:

http://www.TarotSupport.com

 

Continue reading Where Do YOU Turn For Answers?

What To Look For When Buying A Used Lens

1. Absolutely no dings, scraps, marks on the lens body and glass. Especially look closely at the front edges as this is where a drop will almost always make a mark.
2. Shine a light into the lens from both front and back elements to see if there is ANY inside dust, moisture, or the start of fungus (you usually only see fungus if the lens has been in very humid environment for an extended period of time and it often starts showing around the very edges of the glass first)
3. Try to find lenses that have been used in the studio only or came packaged with a new camera and not used at all. Having the original box and packing is a plus.
4. Check to see if the lens moves effortlessly (smooth as silk) when using the focusing ring AND zoom ring AND changing the aperture.
5. Does it come with a filter already on it and do they state they added the filter the minute they got the lens. What does the filter look like – clean, scratched, filmy, dinged etc.
6. Does the outside of the lens look new or dull – as in oil from hands, age, wear, being tossed in a camera bag, carelessly being hung around neck while galloping across fields etc. ūüôā
7. Know who you are buying from and if they are reachable if there is a problem. Do they keep their equipment in a camera bag with separate partitions or just tossed in a bag or laying around attached to a camera body?
8. When buying from ebay, there is always the buyers protection, the pictures (make certain they are of the actual lens and not just stock photos), and your intuition (you know, that gut feeling that tells you this is a great transaction from a trustworthy seller – or not).
9. When you first receive a lens that you have not seen in person…go thru 1-6 above and shoot some images in a variety of lighting, focus, and zoom situations.

Generally, in a perfect world, you will buy used and get a lens that looks and operates like new and you might save a bundle.

Hypothesis: The world has changed and people…. not so much!

I was having a discussion with my dear friend, Connie, about the current weather-based hysteria. She informed me that our discussion left a hypothesis on her doorstep during the night.

A Feature Trophy B Mears Simple

Here it is, with her permission, of course.

“hypothesis: the world has changed but people…. not so much.”

“Whether we’re transmitting info hut to hut with a torch, or trending-tweeting-chirping-pharting-whatever…we’re still a wildly tribal people. We want to know. More than that–we want to know what everyone else thinks about what there is to know.. We want to tell everyone else what our twist is on what they think, and stuff spirals out of¬†factual orbit.”

“I say that if modern humans were plucked up & set down in turn-key medieval times¬†[after a very short time of cultural decompression],¬† they would build the same Catholic church, fight the same wars, make the same choices, on the same stage.”

“Stairs in a Frank Lloyd Wright/Stairs in a pyramid: their nature through history hasn’t fundamentally¬†evolved.” by CL Gilpin

Link to all kinds of historic items she has for sale on ebay!

I think she got it right on. What do you think?

Love In September

Are you in a relationship or wanting to be in a relationship?

Are you wanting to make your current relationship a bit richer or maintain the absolute joy you currently have?

If you answer any of the above questions with a YES, here is a video I shot that may give you some “fuel for the fire”.

Love In September

 

Medicinal Plants in My Garden

So here are some medicinal plants that you might want to include in your Native American Healing Herbs Garden.

Laughing Womyn is really the gardener here and I am the photographer and appreciator of all things beautiful – blooming or otherwise. She also took almost 30 years of her healing and counseling work to create the Radiant Wisdom Tarot and Book.

While I enjoy to the max the wonderful gardens, there is more to living these days…sigh. By adding in this positive tool of Radiant Wisdom Tarot, it’s easy to find answers to questions and be given some actions to take to fulfill dreams. The website is the place to order a set today. What’s not to like about taking great care of, self-nurturing, and healing the bits and pieces of your physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual being.

This is quite a list and the links are included for more information.

Plants for Native American Garden

 

Colors of the 4 directions: East ‚Äď yellow, South ‚Äď red, West ‚Äď blue, North – white

 

Traditional Food plants:

Maize

Source for heirloom maize seeds (zea mays) : http://www.victoryseeds.com/corn.html

Squash

Traditional varieties: Acorn, Boston Marrow, Pumpkin

Source for Boston Marrow (cucurbita maxima) seeds:

http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=1433

Beans

Traditional varieties: kidney, navy, pinto, string, wax, Anasazi

Source for Anasazi Bean seeds:

http://stores.homestead.com/hstrial-Dabbott3/-strse-423/Anasazi-Bean–dsh–500/Detail.bok

Potato

Sweet Potato

Wild Strawberry

Fiddlehead Fern

Asparagus

Tomato

Beets

Cucumber

Cabbage

Carrot

Rhubarb

 

Traditional Medicinal plants of the 4 directions:

East: 

Alum root      Traditional: Heuchera Americana

Amaranth      Traditional: Amaranthus hypochondriacus or A. sanguineus

Lemon Balm & Bee Balm   Traditional: Melissa officinalis

Bird’s Foot Violet     Traditional: Viola pedata

Borage                     Traditional: Borage officinalis

Cardinal Flower        Traditional: Lobelia cardinalis

Columbine               Traditional: Aquilegia vulgaris or A. Canadensis

Fennel           Traditional: Foeniculum vulgare

Foxglove        Traditional: Digitalis purpurea

Garlic            Traditional: Allium sativum

American Ginseng    Traditional: Panax quinquefolius

Goldenseal     Traditional: Hydrastis Canadensis

Heal-all          Traditional: Prunella vulgaris

American Holly

Indian Paintbrush     Traditional: Castilleja coccinea

Lady’s Slipper                     Traditional: Cypripedium calceolus

Lily of the Valley     Traditional: Convallaria majalis

Maidenhair Fern       Traditional: Adiantum pedatum

Marigold        Traditional: Calendula officinalis

Rue               Traditional: Ruta graveolens

Sage              Traditional: Salvia officinalis

Wild Garlic    Traditional: Allium vineale

Yarrow          Traditional: Achillea millefolium

South:

Arnica           Traditional: Arnica Montana

Azalea, flaming        Traditional: Rhododendron calendulaceum

Bear Grass     Traditional: Yucca filamentosa

Beet              Traditional: Beta vulgaris

Bloodroot      Traditional: Sanguinaria Canadensis

Chamomile    Traditional: Matricaria chamomilla or recutita

Comfrey        Traditional: Symphytum officianale

Corn              Traditional: Zea mays

Crownvetch   Traditional: Coronilla varia

Cucumber      Traditional: Cucumis sativus

Dogtooth Violet       Traditional: Erythronium americanum

Evening Primrose     Traditional: Oenothera biennis

Forget-me-Not                    Tradtional: Myosotis scorpioides or M. sylvatica

Four-o’ Clock           Traditional: Mirabilis nyctaginea

Gourd            Traditional: Lagenaria vulgaris

Indian Tobacco         Traditional: Lobelia inflate

Larkspur        Traditional: Delphinium ajacis or D. tricorne

Mayapple

Pansy            Traditional: Viola tricolor

Pumpkin        Traditional: Cucurbita pepa (White Pumpkin)

Sage              Traditional: Salvia officinalis

Soapwort       Traditional: Saponaria officinalis

Strawberry     Traditional: Fragaria vesca

Tansy            Traditional: Tanacetum vulgare

Toadflax                   Traditional: Comandra unbellata

 

West:

Angelica        Traditional: Angelica archangelica

Asparagus

Bean              Traditional: kidney, navy, pinto, string, & wax

Black Cohosh           Traditional: Caulophyllum thalictroides

Blue Eyed Grass       Traditional: Sisyrinchium angustifolium

Blue Flag (Iris)         Traditional: Iris versicolor

Boneset                    Traditional: Eupatorium perfoliatum

Butterfly Weed         Traditional: Asclepia tuberosa

Cabbage

Carrot                      Traditional: Daucus sativus

Flax

Ginger                      Traditional: Allium sativum

Goatsbeard               Traditional: Aruncus dioicus

Hops                        Traditional: Humulus lupulus

Jack-in-the-pulpit

Turks Cap Lily         Traditional: Lilium canadense

Mugwort                  Traditional: Artemisia vulgaris

Parsley

Peppermint

Purple Coneflower    Traditional: Echinacea purpurea

Rhubarb

Rosemary

Spiderwort                Traditional: Tradescantia virginiana

Sunflower                Traditional: helianthus annuus

West continued:

Thyme                                Traditional: Thymus serpyllum

Trillium                   Traditional: Trillium erectum

Turtlehead                Traditional: Chelone glabra

Vervain                    Traditional: Verbena officinialis

Watermelon             Traditional: Citrullus vulgaris

Windflower              Traditional: Thalictrum thalictroides

 

North:

Adam & Eve Root    Traditional: Aplectrum hyemale

Blackberry

Black Cohosh           Traditional: Cimicifuga racemosa

Black-eyed Susan     Traditional: Rudbeckia hirta or R. fulgida

Blazing Star             Traditional: Liatris spicata

Bluebells                  Traditional: Mertensia virginica

Catnip                      Traditional: Nepeta cataria

Chickweed               Traditional: Stellaria media

Chickory                  Traditional: Cichorium intybus

Coltsfoot                  Traditional: Tussilago farfara

Elecampane              Traditional: Inula helenium

Fairywand                Traditional: Chamaelirium luteum

Crested Fern             Traditional: Dryopteris cristata

Feverfew                  Traditional: Chrysanthemum or Tanacetum parthenium

False Foxglove          Traditional: Aureolaria flava

Hearts-a-bustin’        Traditional: Euonymus americanus

Hepatica                   Traditional: Hepatica acutiloba

Lungwort                 Traditional: Pulmonaia officinalis or P. maculate

Field Mint                Traditional: Mentha arvenis

Mountain Laurel

Mouse Ear                Traditional: Gnaphalium uliginosum or Hiercacium pilosella

Oats                         Traditional: Avena sativa

Pale Beardtongue      Traditional: Penstemon pallidus

Pennyroyal

Cayenne Pepper        Traditional: Capsicum frutescens

Redbud Tree

Skullcap                   Traditional : Scutellaria lateriflora

Solomon’s Seal         Traditional : Polygonatum biflorum

False Solomon’s Seal                     Traditional : Smilacina racemosa

Speedwell                 Traditional : Veronica officinalis

Tomato                    Traditional: Lycopersicon esculentum

Wild Indigo              Traditional: Baptisia tinctoria

Wild Licorice            Traditional: Glycyrrhiza lepidota

Witch Hazel shrub

Wood Betony           Traditional: Stachys officinalis

What a great list and opportunity to heal and thrive. Peace and Joy.

My WebSite loads fast

Many have commented on how fast my website loads at www.NashvilleImage.com

I have had many requests for who I use for this fantastic hosting and so I contacted HostGator and they gave me these special codes.

If you use one, you will get the discounts I have listed beside each code for your own super fast hosting account. I have used HostGator for years and have been totally thrilled with the 99.999% uptime and absolutely fantastic customer service with questions (even my elementary ones as a newbie).

Here are my discount codes:

NashvilleImageSavings  use this code for $9.94 savings

NashvilleImageSave25  use this code for 25% savings

NISave2494ForReseller  use this code to save $24.94 off a Reseller account

You can also ask me for my affiliate code but the codes above give you discounts – hurrahhhhhhh!!!!!!

Really big news Part One

I have a couple of really big news items to share.
One is that the Brown County Almanac is doing a story on Weddings in Brown County Indiana and Nashville Image and my wedding ministry is going to a part of the article.
It is wonderful to be seen!
Of course, I love my Wedding couples and am always so honored to have been a part of their commitment to creating their loving relationships for life. It is also an honor to be able to use my 40 years of professional photography to create some photographic memories they will treasure for all time as well as their generations to come.
What is the second big news, you ask? It may seem like trickery but I am so excited about it I just had to mention it existed because I can’t tell you more about “it” yet…right timing is so important AND FUN!
Check back in a couple weeks and I will have Part Two with the details, website, and pics.
Have a great life…I am.

Review of Lowepro Exchange Messenger Bag

I have now used this daily for 2 months and it has become my all time favorite bag for carrying everything I need for back and forth to the studio and out and about essentials as well.

This bag holds a LOT of stuff and I use it to carry a little digital Canon S95 for spontaneous grab shots, wallet, appointment calendar, pens, cell phone, e-cig supplies, business cards, cheater reading glasses, and even a small stainless coffee thermos.

Using the two dividers it comes with, I have the main bag divided in 3 sections. One holds thermos, center holds camera which is in another little Lowepro Rezo 50 with extra batts/memory cards. The 3rd section is for a variety of smaller accessories i.e. pocket calendar, wallet.

Then there are the 3 additional pockets on the front (one even zippered) that make it so easy to have instant access to a variety of small things without digging in the main compartment. This is very handy for cellphone, glasses, pens, business cards, e-cig.

While this is the usual Lowepro durable quality, there is one issue that I have solved AND could have been addressed in the original functional design of this messenger bag…it is too bottom saggy. Left as it was originally designed meant that everyting just kind of lumped together at the bottom of the main compartments even with the dividers.

I easily solved this by taking a divider from another bag, it already had velcro along the full length of each side, and put it in the bottom of my center division with it’s velcro attached to the strips already inside the messanger bag. This has perfectly provided just enough firmness that the bag sits nicely, holds it’s shape, keeps everything well protected, and maintains the super lightweight requirement for a bag I carry daily.

This bag is now fully functional for me, looks great, carries a lot of stuff, can carry lots more as needed from time to time, AND is very comfortable to wear for hours.
I even tossed my regular Canon in my center divided space for a special just-in-case event and it was fine.

I like having a bag that is versatile, doesn’t cry out “I’m a pro photog”, and is durable and comfortable. This bag does it for me.

Birth Control and The Church

I realize that health insurance is a very big expense for businesses. It is even more of an expense for all of us that are self-employed.
The question of whether a Church Institution should be required to have birth-control offered in their insurance coverage for their employees seems like an issue about the quality of respect they have for their employees health choices.
Logic dictates that just because something is covered by health insurance does not mean EVERYONE is going to use all the coverages available.
The argument that The Church is against birth control and therefore should not have to provide that as an insurance option is ridiculous as many other coverages that go against the doctrines of their faith have been covered for years…heart attacks from gluttony, emphysema from smoking, cirrhosis of the liver from drinking, and the ever popular “burning in hell” theory. (OK, maybe the last one isn’t covered by insurance).
Employees get paid to do their jobs and part of that pay is some sort of health assurance and insurance to compensate for the stress, demands, wear-n-tear etc. put on them by the work.